Free Radicals – What Makes Them So Bad?

How Free Radicals Damage Cells

These nasty chemicals called free radicals are a major threat to our body’s cells.   The body generates free radicals as a byproduct of turning food into energy and can be found in the food we eat and the air we breathe.   Some are generated by sunlight and absorbed through the skin or eyes.   They come in different shapes, sizes, and chemical ann j. peters,dr ann peters,dr. ann j. peters,md,md longevity ann j. peters md & dr. ann peters,md longevity reviewsconfigurations, but they are all capable of damaging cells and genetic material.   Free radical damage is involved in the early stages of artery-clogging atherosclerosis and contributes to cancer, vision loss, and many other chronic conditions.

Free Radicals have an “appetite” for electrons and take them from substances that will allow them to.   As explained by Harvard’s School of Public Health “This electron theft can radically alter the “loser’s” structure or function.   Free radical damage will change the instructions coded in a strand of DNA”.  An example of how free radicals can impact our body is when they produce LDL (low-density lipoprotein), also called “bad cholesterol”.   This molecule is very likely to get trapped in an artery wall.  Free radicals can also alter a cell’s membrane and change the flow of what enters and exits the cell.

The good news is that we are not defenseless against free radicals.  Antioxidants give electrons to free radicals “without turning into electron-scavenging substances themselves”.  While each antioxidant has a unique chemical behavior and biological property, no single antioxidant can do the work of many.  This is why diet and anti-aging are so connected.   There are possibly thousands of different substances that can act as antioxidants.   Common vitamins in food like C, E, and beta-carotene are important to helping provide needed nutrition because they provided the different antioxidants a body needs.  Studies have shown that people with low intakes of antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables were at greater risk for developing a chronic condition, and that people who ate plenty of these fruits and vegetables live longer.  The body will continue to resist the relentless attack of free radicals as surely as water douses fire if it receives proper nutrition.

See my article on foods high in antioxidents HERE

About Dr. Ann J Peters: 
Dr. Ann J Peters specializes in anti-aging therapies, natural hormone optimization, low glycemic and anti-inflammatory nutrition and maintaining ideal body composition. Her goal is to help clients look, feel and live longer and healthier lives by delaying, preventing and reversing the signs and symptoms of aging. She attained her medical degree from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ). Dr. Peters completed her medical internships and fellowships at Cornell Medical Center, New York, Harvard School of Public Health and Ospadali Galleria in Genoa, Italy. She is affiliated with the American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine, European Academy of Quality of Life and Longevity Medicine, and the International Hormone Society For more information, please visit: http://www.drannjpeters.com/. You may also follow her on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Foods that Fuel Anti-Aging

Founder of MD Longevity and Anti-Aging Expert, Dr. Ann J Peters, shares how key foods impact aging.

The top Anti-Aging foods Dr. Ann Peter’s recommends are packed with antioxidants.  Foods including berries will help you age successfully.   The darker or bluer varieties berries, such as blueberries or blackberries, have the highest antioxidants.  A study published in the Annals of Neurology determined that eating blueberries or strawberries consistently will help prevent mental decline as we grow older.

The antioxidant compounds found in Green Tea, called “polyphenols”, give it a bitter taste but offer more antioxidants than some vitamin C.  Green Tea has been used in traditional Chinese and Indian medicine to aid in digestion and to prevent heart disease for decades.   However, Dr. Peters warns about the sugary Green Tea soft drinks on the market today ann j. peters,dr ann peters,dr. ann j. peters,md,md longevity ann j. peters md & dr. ann peters,md longevity reviewsand recommends the old-fashioned brew.  She also notes that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) “does not consider it appropriate to fortify snack foods like carbonated beverages” and advises patients not to purchase these.  In addition to the antioxidants Green Tea offers, there is research that it may also lower cholesterol and prevent several types of cancers such as bladder, breast, ovarian, and colon cancer.

Fish, including salmon, herring, tuna, sardines, are loaded with omega-3 fatty acids.  Eating these types of fish will help prevent heart disease and can fight inflammation.  Dr. Peters recommends fish because it reduces mortality rates, especially in people who have had a heart attack.  Since fish is high in protein and low in saturate fat it is much better than other types of meat.  The American Heart Association recommends fish for your heart health and believes omega-3 fatty acids can reduce the risk of arrhythmias (abnormal heartbeats).  Dr. Peters warns that some fish, like shark, swordfish, contain higher levels of mercury and other environmental contaminants.  Shrimp, salmon, canned light tuna, and catfish have lower levels of mercury and for seniors, the benefits far outweigh the potential risk of mercury in fish.

Red wine is good for your heart.  It is high in antioxidants and an anti-aging component called resveratrol.  According to a Harvard study, resveratrol reduces blood clots, decreases inflammation, and possess anti-cancer properties.

We know vegetables are good for our health, but recent studies show there is more to this idea and that consuming more vegetables high in antioxidants will help maintain our memory as we age.  Vegetables high in vitamins such as vitamin A, K, C, and E (i.e. broccoli, carrots, spinach, asparagus, and kale) cooked or raw, are rich in antioxidants.

Olive Oil also contains polyphenols. Researchers believe the benefits of olive oil included memory improvement, digestive health, and in skin care if used topically.

Yogurt contains “friendly bacteria,” or probiotics that are naturally present in the digestive system. It also contains protein and calcium.

Dark Chocolate, with its cocoa falavonols, is on the list because it offers significant anti-cancer properties as well.  Animal Studies have shown the compounds in cocoa can improve the cognitive abilities of older animal and increase their lifespan.

Dr. Peter’s says “The old saying…”the better you eat, the better you will feel” is a scientific fact”, and that “by including Yogurt, Olive Oil, Fish, Berries, Leafy Vegetables, Green Tea, Wine and Chocolate into your diet you are sure to not only enjoy your meal but benefit from it”.

About Dr. Ann J Peters: 
Dr. Ann J Peters specializes in anti-aging therapies, natural hormone optimization, low glycemic and anti-inflammatory nutrition and maintaining ideal body composition. Her goal is to help clients look, feel and live longer and healthier lives by delaying, preventing and reversing the signs and symptoms of aging. She attained her medical degree from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ). Dr. Peters completed her medical internships and fellowships at Cornell Medical Center, New York, Harvard School of Public Health and Ospadali Galleria in Genoa, Italy. She is affiliated with the American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine, European Academy of Quality of Life and Longevity Medicine, and the International Hormone Society For more information, please visit: http://www.drannjpeters.com/. You may also follow her on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Men, Money and Testosterone

Does the hormone testosterone help drive a man to succeed?   While there is an abundance of research on how hormones can impact a man’s physical and mental performance, there is no published research on the correlation of men’s testosterone levels and their bank account balance or professional titles.  But can a correlation between ann j. peters,dr ann peters,dr. ann j. peters,md,md longevity ann j. peters md & dr. ann peters,md longevity reviewsfinancial success and testosterone level be inferred from existing research?

There is certainly plenty of data on the popularity of testosterone replacement therapy.  Bloomberg reports that testosterone sales are expected to triple from $1.6 billion in 2011 to $5 billion by 2017.   Ads for low testosterone treatment are everywhere, promoting how testosterone replacement therapy will help a man feel youthful.  Men of all economic status levels say they look and feel better when their hormone levels are corrected.  Testosterone clearly means more to a man than just its reproductive value, but can we attach a dollar amount to this value?

For decades, people assumed that testosterone was tied to aggression.   If you perceive ambition as a form of aggression and you believe a driven work ethic leads to successful behaviors, you may buy in to the notion that success and hormones have something in common.  However, the evidence doesn’t necessarily show that success is the “work” of testosterone.  In fact, a recent study by Pennsylvania State University researchers concluded that “the belief that Testosterone causes aggression has been proven to be inaccurate”.

According to the The Scientific American, Melvin Konner, an anthropologist at Emory University explains “what psychologists and psychiatrists say is that testosterone has a facilitative effect on aggression”.  “The role of testosterone in social interaction in humans”, according to Christoph Eisenegger of the University of Cambridge and his colleagues at the University of Zurich, can be “conceptualized as bringing motives for seeking social status to the fore.”  Meaning that testosterone alone will not cause a behavior, but that it is a catalyst for behavior.

Testosterone is created by the body to prepare its response to competition and challenges.  Eisenegger’s research says that “testosterone levels rise within minutes in anticipation of both physical and non-physical competitive situations” showing us that “testosterone doesn’t just influence social behavior, it is also influenced by the nature of that behavior”.   Hormones will not cause a particular outcome, like success, but they will “facilitate or inhibit the likelihood that such an outcome will occur.”  So testosterone can be seen as an ingredient for success, but not a direct cause.

As a physician specializing in hormone replacement, I know testosterone levels absolutely impact a man’s physical and mental performance.  However, whether a man’s testosterone levels will lead to his success is ultimately up to the nature of his situation.  Regardless of his bank account or title, hormones will impact the outcome of how a man lives his life, how he reacts, how he works and how he moves forward and ages, successfully or not, rich or poor.

For those who are interested in Hormone Replacement treatments, having a medical doctor oversee your care is critical.  A physician will look at the patients’ entire medical history and current blood tests and other lab work may be necessary.   You physician should advise you about changes you will see, such as changes in sleep patterns and mood.  Helping patients understand how their body reacts to nutritional change and supplements should be a part of a doctor’s oversight.  This doctor patient communication is critical.  An open and honest look at a patient’s lifestyle and a willingness to be proactive in fighting off disease is needed.

A man’s willingness to discuss behavioral modification and follow a prescribed regiment of supplements and vitamins is a necessary component to any successful hormone treatment.

Men are concerned more now than ever about their health and the effects of aging, especially those with higher degrees of responsibility and career demands.  Many business leaders are working later in life, putting off retirement for to continue with their career and staying active.  Just look at men like Warren Buffett and Ted Turner….older, driven and healthy men who maintain their stamina as a desire more than a requirement.  These are the men who benefit most from Low T treatment.

About Dr. Peters:  Dr. Peters medical practice is focused on anti-aging and longevity with offices in San Francisco, New York and Palm Beach.  Helping clients look, feel and live longer and better by delaying, preventing and reversing the signs and symptoms of aging.  She received the most prestigious cosmopolitan education around the world.  A graduate with a medical degree from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ), she completed her medical internships and fellowships at Cornell Medical Center, New York, Harvard School of Public Health and Ospadali Galleria in Genoa, Italy.  She is a past scholar of Leopold Schlep Foundation, and the Organization of American States (OAS), New York.

Her medical affiliations include American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine, European Academy of Quality of Life and Longevity Medicine and the International Hormone Society. Board Certified with the American Academy of Family Physicians, she is a diplomat with the American Board of Family Practice and an award-recognized physician from Harvard School of Public Health.

For more information on Dr. Peters go to http://www.mdlongevity.com

 

Dr. Ann J Peters on the Importance of Telomeres

I recommend telomere length assessment for my paitents as a way to measure cellular aging.  This article is from Life Length. the first company in the world to make Telomere Analysis Technology (TAT), developed by Dr. Maria Blasco, current Director of the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), available to individuals on a commercial basis.

“Telomeres are specialized structures on the ends of chromosomes that protect them from fusions and degradation in this way ensuring cell viability. Telomere loss, however, occurs as a natural result of normal DNA replication.

  • Telomeres protect chromosomes against degradation, fusion, and rearrangements during DNA replication
  • Telomeres preserve the integrity of chromosomes by allowing the complete replication of the ends of chromosomal DNA through the activity of the enzyme telomerase
  • Telomeres facilitate the correct positioning of the chromosomes within the nucleus for replication

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In mammalian cells, telomeres are composed of tandem repeats of the TTAGGG sequence that span10 to 15 kilobases and the various proteins that bind to this region.

During DNA replication, the terminal end of the telomere is not replicated resulting in the continual shortening of telomeres losing TTAGGG repeats.

The average number of base pairs lost per year varies depending upon both genetic and environmental factors.

Eventually, the telomeres shorten to a critical length resulting in chromosomal instability and loss of cell viability.”

Knowing the length of a person’s telomeres allows a better understanding and treatment for the individual’s cellular health and anti-aging process.

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About Dr. Peters:  Dr. Peters medical practice is focused on anti-aging and longevity with offices in San Francisco, New York and Palm Beach.  Helping clients look, feel and live longer and better by delaying, preventing and reversing the signs and symptoms of aging. She received the most prestigious cosmopolitan education around the world.  A graduate with a medical degree from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ), she completed her medical internships and fellowships at Cornell Medical Center, New York, Harvard School of Public Health and Ospadali Galleria in Genoa, Italy.  She is a past scholar of Leopold Schlep Foundation, and the Organization of American States (OAS), New York.

Her medical affiliations include American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine, European Academy of Quality of Life and Longevity Medicine and the International Hormone Society. Board Certified with the American Academy of Family Physicians, she is a diplomat with the American Board of Family Practice and an award-recognized physician from Harvard School of Public Health.

For more information on Dr. Peters go to http://www.mdlongevity.com

 

 

Dr. Ann J Peters Discusses the Importance of the Functional Medicine Movement

The Functional Medicine movement could be an historic event in the American healthcare system. Will this critical medical practice get lost in the noise of Healthcare Reform or radically change the future of patient care?
Palm Beach, FL – Dr. Ann J Peters, a doctor committed to creating optimal quality of life for her patients, is an advocate in helping Americans learn and understand the importance of the Functional Medicine Movement. The risk of this method of preventative medicine getting lost in the Healthcare Reform act is very high. Because of its potential to transform the lives of Americans everywhere, it is important to make its value well known, to allow it to change the future of patient care from one that is based on treating diseases to one that is focused on preventing diseases.The Functional Medicine Movement transfers the focus of today’s healthcare from managing symptoms and curing diseases to preventing chronic diseases from occurring at all. With the proper methods and tools, that include taking into consideration the genetic makeup of individuals, various environmental risks and their current lifestyle, physicians can help patients determine the underlying causes of chronic diseases. This can take the place of the current medical practice of simply managing the symptoms or dealing with medical emergencies when they arise. Patients can learn how to live their lives to prevent chronic diseases from occurring in the first place. This could prove to provide patients with longer, happier lives.

This future of the American healthcare system is based on years of education and research and is slowly being adapted into the medical curriculum for current students as well as continuing education for current doctors. In order for the Functional Medicine Movement to become a part of the national healthcare system, greater awareness of the program needs to be made. Americans need to understand the value of prevention rather than treatment to end the epidemic of people suffering from chronic diseases, including heart disease, cancer and mental illness.

The premise behind Dr. Ann J Peters’ practice is to focus on natural ways to fight the aging process and instill a sense of longevity in her patients’ lives. It is only normal for everyone to look and feel good, which is only possible through the use of prevention of chronic disease.

To learn more about Dr. Ann J Peters and her work as a leader in the anti-aging industry, visit http://www.drannjpetersfl.com/ or call 561-291-6997 to get in touch with her directly.

About Dr. Ann J Peters:

Ann J Peters is a leader in the anti-aging industry, with many recognitions and awards to show her expertise. Receiving her medical degree from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Dr. Peters is a diplomat with the American Board of Family Practice as well as an award winning physician from the Harvard School of Public Health. Her passion for helping others make the most out of their lives has helped many patients live a longer, fuller life free from unnecessary disease, pain or suffering.

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Is it low T?

A lot more men are asking…what is low testosterone and is hormone replacement right for them?

Testosterone in Men:

Testosterone is the primary male sex hormone and is secreted by the adrenal glands and testes. It is critical in maintaining erectile function, libido, normal energy levels, good mood. As with other hormones, testosterone levels decline with age and at age 60 is about one fifth of what it was in youth. Testosterone levels start declining by 30 years of age.

Symptoms of decreasing testosterone appear as gradual decrease in energy, thinning bones and muscles, increased body fat, depression and impaired sexual function. Studies over the past decade show that replacing testosterone can help restore a man’s health.ann j. peters,dr ann peters,dr. ann j. peters,md,md longevity ann j. peters md & dr. ann peters,md longevity reviews

It has also been shown that Testosterone plays an important role in the functioning of the brain. It appears to have a profound impact on the way a man thinks and how well his brain performs learning and memory functions. Results show that testosterone supplementation improves visual and spatial skills.

Experts say normal levels for men range from 300 to 1,200 nanograms per deciliter, with testosterone peaking during the teens and 20s and declining about 1% a year after 30.

Research shows an estimated 3% to 7% of men 30 to 69 have a testosterone deficiency called male hypogonadism, which they can be born with or develop after an injury or infection.

A blood test is the only accurate way of determining testosterone levels.  Hormone replacement treatment supervised by a physician is safe and can make a world of difference in a man with Low T.  Every man experiencing any of the symptoms of Low T should talk to his physician.  It’s no longer a stigma and the cure is better than feeling bad for years!

About Dr. Peters:  Dr. Peters medical practice is focused on anti-aging and longevity with offices in San Francisco, New York and Palm Beach.  Helping clients look, feel and live longer and better by delaying, preventing and reversing the signs and symptoms of aging.  She received the most prestigious cosmopolitan education around the world.  A graduate with a medical degree from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ), she completed her medical internships and fellowships at Cornell Medical Center, New York, Harvard School of Public Health and Ospadali Galleria in Genoa, Italy.  She is a past scholar of Leopold Schlep Foundation, and the Organization of American States (OAS), New York.

Her medical affiliations include American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine, European Academy of Quality of Life and Longevity Medicine and the International Hormone Society. Board Certified with the American Academy of Family Physicians, she is a diplomat with the American Board of Family Practice and an award-recognized physician from Harvard School of Public Health.

For more information on Dr. Peters go to http://www.mdlongevity.com

What is HRT?

We found this article published on ABC.net to be a helpful explanation of HRT….

Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT): understanding its benefits and risks

by Pamela Wilson

HRT, once a source of worry and confusion, is now considered an effective and safe treatment for many women troubled by symptoms of menopause.

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For some women, the physical, psychological and mental symptoms of menopause can be debilitating and life-changing.

But there are things women can do to help them regain control of their physical and emotional health during this period of their life; and hormone replacement therapy, which was once a source of great concern, is recognised as a safe and effective way to treat menopause symptoms.

What is HRT and its effects on menopausal symptoms?

Hormone replacement therapy (HRT), also known as hormone therapy (HT), is a medication containing the hormones oestrogen and progesterone, and in some cases testosterone, that can help reduce symptoms of menopause.

It is internationally acknowledged that HRT is the most effective treatment to combat these symptoms, which include hot flushes, night sweats, insomnia, joint aches, muscle pains and vaginal dryness. There is also evidence it may improve psychological wellbeing during this time.

HRT is best started:

  • during the years leading up to menopause or peri-menopause
  • before the age of 60
  • within ten years of menopause (that is from the final period a woman has).

It is also recommended that women experiencing premature menopause take HRT, at least until the age of natural menopause, which is between the ages of 45 and 55 (51 being the average).

Oestrogen-only formulations can be taken by women who’ve had a hysterectomy; combined HRT, which contains both oestrogen and progesterone, is recommended for women who haven’t had a hysterectomy because progesterone protects the uterus against cancer.

Can HRT benefit your health in other ways?

Although HRT is prescribed to alleviate the symptoms of menopause, it can have additional positive effects on a woman’s health, particularly if she takes it before the age of 60 or within 10 years of menopause.

  • Osteoporosis: it can prevent osteoporosis-related fractures. This protection doesn’t continue after five years of stopping HRT.
  • Heart disease: oestrogen-only HRT can reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. But it may actually increase the risk in women who start HRT tablets after the age of 60, and particularly over 70.
  • Dementia: while some studies indicate oestrogen may prevent or delay the onset of Alzheimer’s disease, the evidence is still slim and inconclusive.

Does it have side effects or negative health risks?

Publicity about negative health risks associated with HRT peaked in the years following a major 2002 study, known as the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), which showed HRT was linked with a raised risk of breast cancer, blood clots and strokes.

However, later analysis found the interpretations of the original findings from this study were flawed. One of the key problems was that the women in the study were significantly older than those who would normally seek treatment with HRT (with different underlying risks of disease), and yet the findings on disease risk were inappropriately extrapolated to healthy newly menopausal women. Anxiety about the WHI study results led to a 50 per cent drop in the use of HRT.

Evidence that has emerged in the decade since the 2002 study shows “that for most women starting treatment near the menopause, the benefits outweigh the risks, not just for the relief of hot flushes, night sweats and vaginal dryness, but also for reducing the risks of heart disease and fractures,” the principal investigator at the WHI Clinical Centre at the University of California, Dr Robert Langer, said in a statement marking the 10th anniversary of the study.

Current evidence shows there can be minor side effects with some HRT formulations. These include intermittent bleeding, breast discomfort, bloating and nausea.

HRT can also increase the chance of developing more serious health complications, but this risk is usually small and can be lowered further with a careful and tailored approach to HRT medications.

  • Blood clots: although there is a small risk of developing a blood clot while taking HRT (especially tablet form), it is rare if you are under the age of 60. It is more common in the first year of use and with other risk factors such as smoking and obesity.
  • Breast cancer: research shows an increased risk of developing breast cancer, but it is small and dependent on the type of HRT and length of time it’s used. For women taking oestrogen-only HRT their risk doesn’t increase for at least seven years of use; for women taking combined HRT it doesn’t increase for four to five years of use.
  • Uterine cancer: while oestrogen-only HRT can increase your chance of developing this cancer, combined HRT doesn’t. This is why women who haven’t had a hysterectomy are advised to take HRT that includes progesterone.
  • Bowel cancer: some evidence suggests it may protect against bowel cancer.

HRT is not recommended in women who have a history of breast cancer, blood clots, heart disease or stroke, or who have endometrial cancer or unexplained vaginal bleeding.

Which HRT formulation may suit you best?

Before taking HRT it’s vital women have a full medical check-up and discuss their own personal and family medical history with their doctor, so the risks and benefits of HRT can be individualised and the HRT tailored appropriately.

The different formulations are: tablets, skin patches, intra-uterine devices (IUD), gels and creams.

  • Tablets: taken daily, tablets are the most popular and commonly available formulation.
  • Skin patches: applied every three to four days, these work by slowly releasing hormones into your body. They can have fewer side effects (particularly in relation to nausea and clots), but can be irritating for some women. Absorption is understood to be more reliable and even than tablets.
  • IUD: for women who can’t tolerate progesterone tablets, the hormone can be delivered via an IUD.
  • Gel: an oestrogen gel, rubbed onto the skin daily, is a good option for women who can’t tolerate tablets and who don’t want a patch.
  • Creams: oestrogen creams that are inserted into the vagina can be useful for symptoms such as bladder leakage and dryness.

 Source:  http://www.abc.net.au/health/thepulse/stories/2013/05/29/3769270.htm#.Ub9oIPkqYrc

Why Melatonin is Way More Than a Sleep Aid

What is Melatonin?|  Melatonin is a hormone made by the pineal gland. This tiny gland is found in the brain. Natural melatonin will help your body’s internal clock control your natural cycle of sleeping and waking hours. It regulates the circadian rhythm and the deep stages of sleep we get.

The amount of light we’re in affects how much melatonin our body produces. Melatonin levels start to rise in the mid- to late evening, remain high during the night, and then levels drop off in the early morning hours. During the shorter days of winter, your body will produce melatonin either earlier or later in the day than normal. This change may lead to symptoms of seasonal affective disorder (SAD), or winter depression.p stages of sleep. Melatonin also helps maintains the body’s balance, equilibrium and homeostasis.

Melatonin can be found in foods such as meats, grains, fruits, and vegetables, but only in very small amounts and natural melatonin levels will slowly drop with age. Older adults can find that supplementing this hormone is very beneficial to their health. These are the benefits and some symptoms you may experience if your body does not producing enough of this hormone…

Benefits of melatonin include:

  • Powerful antioxidant properties
  • Fights cancerann j. peters,dr ann peters,dr. ann j. peters,md,md longevity ann j. peters md & dr. ann peters,md longevity reviews
  • Boosts immune function
  • Scavenges free radicals
  • Promotes youthful sleep patterns
  • Influences stage IV & REM sleep
  • Prevents jet lag
  • Regulates mood
  • Is an energizer
  • Increases natural killer cells and CD-4 cells

DEFICIENCY CAUSES:

  • Poor Sleep
  • Jet Lag
  • Irritability
  • Hypersensitivity
  • Premature Aging
  • Nocturia (excessive night time urination)

In most adults, melatonin is taken in doses from 0.2 to 20.0 mg, based on why it is being used. The right dose will vary from one person to another, so it is important to consult a doctor to learn what the right dosage is for you.

About Dr. Peters:  Dr. Peters medical practice is focused on anti-aging and longevity.  Helping clients look, feel and live longer and better by delaying, preventing and reversing the signs and symptoms of aging.  She received the most prestigious cosmopolitan education around the world.  A graduate with a medical degree from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ), she completed her medical internships and fellowships at Cornell Medical Center, New York, Harvard School of Public Health and Ospadali Galleria in Genoa, Italy.  She is a past scholar of Leopold Schlep Foundation, and the Organization of American States (OAS), New York.

Her medical affiliations include American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine, European Academy of Quality of Life and Longevity Medicine and the International Hormone Society. Board Certified with the American Academy of Family Physicians, she is a diplomat with the American Board of Family Practice and an award-recognized physician from Harvard School of Public Health.

For more information on Dr. Peters go to http://www.mdlongevity.com

Mayo Clinic’s Overview on the Benefits of Hormone Therapy

Source:  http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/hormone-therapy/WO00046

Here are the benefits outlined by the Mayo Clinic for Hormone Therapy:

The benefits of hormone therapy depend, in part, on whether you take systemic hormone therapy or low-dose vaginal preparations of estrogen.

  • Systemic hormone therapy. Systemic estrogen — which comes in pill, skin patch, gel, cream or spray form — remains the most effective treatment for relief of troublesome menopausal hot flashes and night sweats. Estrogen can also ease vaginal symptoms of menopause, such as dryness, itching, burning and discomfort with intercourse. Although the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) still approves estrogen for the prevention of the bone-thinning disease called osteoporosis, doctors usually recommend medications called bisphosphonates to treat osteoporosis.
  • Low-dose vaginal products. Low-dose vaginal preparations of estrogen — which come in cream, tablet or ring form — can effectively treat vaginal symptoms and some urinary symptoms, while minimizing absorption into the body. Low-dose vaginal preparations do not help with hot flashes, night sweats or protection against osteoporosis.

Long-term systemic hormone therapy for the prevention of postmenopausal conditions is no longer routinely recommended. But some data suggest that estrogen can decrease the risk of heart disease when taken early in postmenopausal years:

  • In a recent Danish study, after 10 years of treatment, women receiving hormone replacement therapy early after menopause had a significantly reduced risk of mortality, heart failure or heart attack, without any apparent increase in risk of cancer or stroke.

MD Longevity Review: The History of Functional Medicine

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Susan And Jeffrey Bland

“Twenty years ago, functional medicine was an idea without a movement.  It is now a movement that is the single biggest game-changing idea in health care.”

The Functional Medicine Movement became more widely known after inception of The Institute for Functional Medicine (IFM).  Founded 20 years ago by Susan and Jeffrey Bland, the Institute’s charter was conceived as a systems-biology approach to the prevention and management of chronic disease utilizing appropriate tools including nutrition, lifestyle, exercise, environment, structural, cognitive, emotional, and pharmaceutical therapies to meet the individual needs of the patient.

It was the Bland’s vision to change the future of health care by developing new thought leaders and practitioners, skilled at preventing and treating chronic disease.   They put it this way:  ”We are preparing for the next 20 years with a clear strategic plan based on education, research, and collaboration. Our goal is to reverse the epidemic of chronic disease and to continue advancing the leading edge of knowledge in the decades ahead.”

To accomplish this goal, IFM built an educational platform “using innovative technologies and teaching methods that can be incorporated into medical school curriculums, residencies, fellowships, and continuing medical education”.  The Bland’s efforts have lead to the development of research models that evaluate whole-systems practices and treatment plans that involve “individualized and diverse interventions”.  To achieve these educational and research goals, IFM has collaborated with leaders in academic medicine, private sector industry, insurers, and government agencies to create pilot programs that will help integrate functional medicine into the nation’s healthcare system.

For more information about Functional Medicine click here: http://blog.mdlongevity.com/blog/?p=178

About Dr. Peters:  Dr. Peters medical practice is focused on anti-aging and longevity.  Helping clients look, feel and live longer and better by delaying, preventing and reversing the signs and symptoms of aging.  She received the most prestigious cosmopolitan education around the world.  A graduate with a medical degree from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ), she completed her medical internships and fellowships at Cornell Medical Center, New York, Harvard School of Public Health and Ospadali Galleria in Genoa, Italy.  She is a past scholar of Leopold Schlep Foundation, and the Organization of American States (OAS), New York.

Her medical affiliations include American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine, European Academy of Quality of Life and Longevity Medicine and the International Hormone Society. Board Certified with the American Academy of Family Physicians, she is a diplomat with the American Board of Family Practice and an award-recognized physician from Harvard School of Public Health.

Source: http://www.functionalmedicine.org