Men, Money and Testosterone

Does the hormone testosterone help drive a man to succeed?   While there is an abundance of research on how hormones can impact a man’s physical and mental performance, there is no published research on the correlation of men’s testosterone levels and their bank account balance or professional titles.  But can a correlation between ann j. peters,dr ann peters,dr. ann j. peters,md,md longevity ann j. peters md & dr. ann peters,md longevity reviewsfinancial success and testosterone level be inferred from existing research?

There is certainly plenty of data on the popularity of testosterone replacement therapy.  Bloomberg reports that testosterone sales are expected to triple from $1.6 billion in 2011 to $5 billion by 2017.   Ads for low testosterone treatment are everywhere, promoting how testosterone replacement therapy will help a man feel youthful.  Men of all economic status levels say they look and feel better when their hormone levels are corrected.  Testosterone clearly means more to a man than just its reproductive value, but can we attach a dollar amount to this value?

For decades, people assumed that testosterone was tied to aggression.   If you perceive ambition as a form of aggression and you believe a driven work ethic leads to successful behaviors, you may buy in to the notion that success and hormones have something in common.  However, the evidence doesn’t necessarily show that success is the “work” of testosterone.  In fact, a recent study by Pennsylvania State University researchers concluded that “the belief that Testosterone causes aggression has been proven to be inaccurate”.

According to the The Scientific American, Melvin Konner, an anthropologist at Emory University explains “what psychologists and psychiatrists say is that testosterone has a facilitative effect on aggression”.  “The role of testosterone in social interaction in humans”, according to Christoph Eisenegger of the University of Cambridge and his colleagues at the University of Zurich, can be “conceptualized as bringing motives for seeking social status to the fore.”  Meaning that testosterone alone will not cause a behavior, but that it is a catalyst for behavior.

Testosterone is created by the body to prepare its response to competition and challenges.  Eisenegger’s research says that “testosterone levels rise within minutes in anticipation of both physical and non-physical competitive situations” showing us that “testosterone doesn’t just influence social behavior, it is also influenced by the nature of that behavior”.   Hormones will not cause a particular outcome, like success, but they will “facilitate or inhibit the likelihood that such an outcome will occur.”  So testosterone can be seen as an ingredient for success, but not a direct cause.

As a physician specializing in hormone replacement, I know testosterone levels absolutely impact a man’s physical and mental performance.  However, whether a man’s testosterone levels will lead to his success is ultimately up to the nature of his situation.  Regardless of his bank account or title, hormones will impact the outcome of how a man lives his life, how he reacts, how he works and how he moves forward and ages, successfully or not, rich or poor.

For those who are interested in Hormone Replacement treatments, having a medical doctor oversee your care is critical.  A physician will look at the patients’ entire medical history and current blood tests and other lab work may be necessary.   You physician should advise you about changes you will see, such as changes in sleep patterns and mood.  Helping patients understand how their body reacts to nutritional change and supplements should be a part of a doctor’s oversight.  This doctor patient communication is critical.  An open and honest look at a patient’s lifestyle and a willingness to be proactive in fighting off disease is needed.

A man’s willingness to discuss behavioral modification and follow a prescribed regiment of supplements and vitamins is a necessary component to any successful hormone treatment.

Men are concerned more now than ever about their health and the effects of aging, especially those with higher degrees of responsibility and career demands.  Many business leaders are working later in life, putting off retirement for to continue with their career and staying active.  Just look at men like Warren Buffett and Ted Turner….older, driven and healthy men who maintain their stamina as a desire more than a requirement.  These are the men who benefit most from Low T treatment.

About Dr. Peters:  Dr. Peters medical practice is focused on anti-aging and longevity with offices in San Francisco, New York and Palm Beach.  Helping clients look, feel and live longer and better by delaying, preventing and reversing the signs and symptoms of aging.  She received the most prestigious cosmopolitan education around the world.  A graduate with a medical degree from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ), she completed her medical internships and fellowships at Cornell Medical Center, New York, Harvard School of Public Health and Ospadali Galleria in Genoa, Italy.  She is a past scholar of Leopold Schlep Foundation, and the Organization of American States (OAS), New York.

Her medical affiliations include American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine, European Academy of Quality of Life and Longevity Medicine and the International Hormone Society. Board Certified with the American Academy of Family Physicians, she is a diplomat with the American Board of Family Practice and an award-recognized physician from Harvard School of Public Health.

For more information on Dr. Peters go to http://www.mdlongevity.com

 

Is it low T?

A lot more men are asking…what is low testosterone and is hormone replacement right for them?

Testosterone in Men:

Testosterone is the primary male sex hormone and is secreted by the adrenal glands and testes. It is critical in maintaining erectile function, libido, normal energy levels, good mood. As with other hormones, testosterone levels decline with age and at age 60 is about one fifth of what it was in youth. Testosterone levels start declining by 30 years of age.

Symptoms of decreasing testosterone appear as gradual decrease in energy, thinning bones and muscles, increased body fat, depression and impaired sexual function. Studies over the past decade show that replacing testosterone can help restore a man’s health.ann j. peters,dr ann peters,dr. ann j. peters,md,md longevity ann j. peters md & dr. ann peters,md longevity reviews

It has also been shown that Testosterone plays an important role in the functioning of the brain. It appears to have a profound impact on the way a man thinks and how well his brain performs learning and memory functions. Results show that testosterone supplementation improves visual and spatial skills.

Experts say normal levels for men range from 300 to 1,200 nanograms per deciliter, with testosterone peaking during the teens and 20s and declining about 1% a year after 30.

Research shows an estimated 3% to 7% of men 30 to 69 have a testosterone deficiency called male hypogonadism, which they can be born with or develop after an injury or infection.

A blood test is the only accurate way of determining testosterone levels.  Hormone replacement treatment supervised by a physician is safe and can make a world of difference in a man with Low T.  Every man experiencing any of the symptoms of Low T should talk to his physician.  It’s no longer a stigma and the cure is better than feeling bad for years!

About Dr. Peters:  Dr. Peters medical practice is focused on anti-aging and longevity with offices in San Francisco, New York and Palm Beach.  Helping clients look, feel and live longer and better by delaying, preventing and reversing the signs and symptoms of aging.  She received the most prestigious cosmopolitan education around the world.  A graduate with a medical degree from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ), she completed her medical internships and fellowships at Cornell Medical Center, New York, Harvard School of Public Health and Ospadali Galleria in Genoa, Italy.  She is a past scholar of Leopold Schlep Foundation, and the Organization of American States (OAS), New York.

Her medical affiliations include American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine, European Academy of Quality of Life and Longevity Medicine and the International Hormone Society. Board Certified with the American Academy of Family Physicians, she is a diplomat with the American Board of Family Practice and an award-recognized physician from Harvard School of Public Health.

For more information on Dr. Peters go to http://www.mdlongevity.com

What is HRT?

We found this article published on ABC.net to be a helpful explanation of HRT….

Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT): understanding its benefits and risks

by Pamela Wilson

HRT, once a source of worry and confusion, is now considered an effective and safe treatment for many women troubled by symptoms of menopause.

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For some women, the physical, psychological and mental symptoms of menopause can be debilitating and life-changing.

But there are things women can do to help them regain control of their physical and emotional health during this period of their life; and hormone replacement therapy, which was once a source of great concern, is recognised as a safe and effective way to treat menopause symptoms.

What is HRT and its effects on menopausal symptoms?

Hormone replacement therapy (HRT), also known as hormone therapy (HT), is a medication containing the hormones oestrogen and progesterone, and in some cases testosterone, that can help reduce symptoms of menopause.

It is internationally acknowledged that HRT is the most effective treatment to combat these symptoms, which include hot flushes, night sweats, insomnia, joint aches, muscle pains and vaginal dryness. There is also evidence it may improve psychological wellbeing during this time.

HRT is best started:

  • during the years leading up to menopause or peri-menopause
  • before the age of 60
  • within ten years of menopause (that is from the final period a woman has).

It is also recommended that women experiencing premature menopause take HRT, at least until the age of natural menopause, which is between the ages of 45 and 55 (51 being the average).

Oestrogen-only formulations can be taken by women who’ve had a hysterectomy; combined HRT, which contains both oestrogen and progesterone, is recommended for women who haven’t had a hysterectomy because progesterone protects the uterus against cancer.

Can HRT benefit your health in other ways?

Although HRT is prescribed to alleviate the symptoms of menopause, it can have additional positive effects on a woman’s health, particularly if she takes it before the age of 60 or within 10 years of menopause.

  • Osteoporosis: it can prevent osteoporosis-related fractures. This protection doesn’t continue after five years of stopping HRT.
  • Heart disease: oestrogen-only HRT can reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. But it may actually increase the risk in women who start HRT tablets after the age of 60, and particularly over 70.
  • Dementia: while some studies indicate oestrogen may prevent or delay the onset of Alzheimer’s disease, the evidence is still slim and inconclusive.

Does it have side effects or negative health risks?

Publicity about negative health risks associated with HRT peaked in the years following a major 2002 study, known as the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), which showed HRT was linked with a raised risk of breast cancer, blood clots and strokes.

However, later analysis found the interpretations of the original findings from this study were flawed. One of the key problems was that the women in the study were significantly older than those who would normally seek treatment with HRT (with different underlying risks of disease), and yet the findings on disease risk were inappropriately extrapolated to healthy newly menopausal women. Anxiety about the WHI study results led to a 50 per cent drop in the use of HRT.

Evidence that has emerged in the decade since the 2002 study shows “that for most women starting treatment near the menopause, the benefits outweigh the risks, not just for the relief of hot flushes, night sweats and vaginal dryness, but also for reducing the risks of heart disease and fractures,” the principal investigator at the WHI Clinical Centre at the University of California, Dr Robert Langer, said in a statement marking the 10th anniversary of the study.

Current evidence shows there can be minor side effects with some HRT formulations. These include intermittent bleeding, breast discomfort, bloating and nausea.

HRT can also increase the chance of developing more serious health complications, but this risk is usually small and can be lowered further with a careful and tailored approach to HRT medications.

  • Blood clots: although there is a small risk of developing a blood clot while taking HRT (especially tablet form), it is rare if you are under the age of 60. It is more common in the first year of use and with other risk factors such as smoking and obesity.
  • Breast cancer: research shows an increased risk of developing breast cancer, but it is small and dependent on the type of HRT and length of time it’s used. For women taking oestrogen-only HRT their risk doesn’t increase for at least seven years of use; for women taking combined HRT it doesn’t increase for four to five years of use.
  • Uterine cancer: while oestrogen-only HRT can increase your chance of developing this cancer, combined HRT doesn’t. This is why women who haven’t had a hysterectomy are advised to take HRT that includes progesterone.
  • Bowel cancer: some evidence suggests it may protect against bowel cancer.

HRT is not recommended in women who have a history of breast cancer, blood clots, heart disease or stroke, or who have endometrial cancer or unexplained vaginal bleeding.

Which HRT formulation may suit you best?

Before taking HRT it’s vital women have a full medical check-up and discuss their own personal and family medical history with their doctor, so the risks and benefits of HRT can be individualised and the HRT tailored appropriately.

The different formulations are: tablets, skin patches, intra-uterine devices (IUD), gels and creams.

  • Tablets: taken daily, tablets are the most popular and commonly available formulation.
  • Skin patches: applied every three to four days, these work by slowly releasing hormones into your body. They can have fewer side effects (particularly in relation to nausea and clots), but can be irritating for some women. Absorption is understood to be more reliable and even than tablets.
  • IUD: for women who can’t tolerate progesterone tablets, the hormone can be delivered via an IUD.
  • Gel: an oestrogen gel, rubbed onto the skin daily, is a good option for women who can’t tolerate tablets and who don’t want a patch.
  • Creams: oestrogen creams that are inserted into the vagina can be useful for symptoms such as bladder leakage and dryness.

 Source:  http://www.abc.net.au/health/thepulse/stories/2013/05/29/3769270.htm#.Ub9oIPkqYrc