Dr. Ann J Peters on the Importance of Telomeres

I recommend telomere length assessment for my paitents as a way to measure cellular aging.  This article is from Life Length. the first company in the world to make Telomere Analysis Technology (TAT), developed by Dr. Maria Blasco, current Director of the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), available to individuals on a commercial basis.

“Telomeres are specialized structures on the ends of chromosomes that protect them from fusions and degradation in this way ensuring cell viability. Telomere loss, however, occurs as a natural result of normal DNA replication.

  • Telomeres protect chromosomes against degradation, fusion, and rearrangements during DNA replication
  • Telomeres preserve the integrity of chromosomes by allowing the complete replication of the ends of chromosomal DNA through the activity of the enzyme telomerase
  • Telomeres facilitate the correct positioning of the chromosomes within the nucleus for replication

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In mammalian cells, telomeres are composed of tandem repeats of the TTAGGG sequence that span10 to 15 kilobases and the various proteins that bind to this region.

During DNA replication, the terminal end of the telomere is not replicated resulting in the continual shortening of telomeres losing TTAGGG repeats.

The average number of base pairs lost per year varies depending upon both genetic and environmental factors.

Eventually, the telomeres shorten to a critical length resulting in chromosomal instability and loss of cell viability.”

Knowing the length of a person’s telomeres allows a better understanding and treatment for the individual’s cellular health and anti-aging process.

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About Dr. Peters:  Dr. Peters medical practice is focused on anti-aging and longevity with offices in San Francisco, New York and Palm Beach.  Helping clients look, feel and live longer and better by delaying, preventing and reversing the signs and symptoms of aging. She received the most prestigious cosmopolitan education around the world.  A graduate with a medical degree from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ), she completed her medical internships and fellowships at Cornell Medical Center, New York, Harvard School of Public Health and Ospadali Galleria in Genoa, Italy.  She is a past scholar of Leopold Schlep Foundation, and the Organization of American States (OAS), New York.

Her medical affiliations include American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine, European Academy of Quality of Life and Longevity Medicine and the International Hormone Society. Board Certified with the American Academy of Family Physicians, she is a diplomat with the American Board of Family Practice and an award-recognized physician from Harvard School of Public Health.

For more information on Dr. Peters go to http://www.mdlongevity.com

 

 

Dr. Ann J Peters Discusses the Importance of the Functional Medicine Movement

The Functional Medicine movement could be an historic event in the American healthcare system. Will this critical medical practice get lost in the noise of Healthcare Reform or radically change the future of patient care?
Palm Beach, FL – Dr. Ann J Peters, a doctor committed to creating optimal quality of life for her patients, is an advocate in helping Americans learn and understand the importance of the Functional Medicine Movement. The risk of this method of preventative medicine getting lost in the Healthcare Reform act is very high. Because of its potential to transform the lives of Americans everywhere, it is important to make its value well known, to allow it to change the future of patient care from one that is based on treating diseases to one that is focused on preventing diseases.The Functional Medicine Movement transfers the focus of today’s healthcare from managing symptoms and curing diseases to preventing chronic diseases from occurring at all. With the proper methods and tools, that include taking into consideration the genetic makeup of individuals, various environmental risks and their current lifestyle, physicians can help patients determine the underlying causes of chronic diseases. This can take the place of the current medical practice of simply managing the symptoms or dealing with medical emergencies when they arise. Patients can learn how to live their lives to prevent chronic diseases from occurring in the first place. This could prove to provide patients with longer, happier lives.

This future of the American healthcare system is based on years of education and research and is slowly being adapted into the medical curriculum for current students as well as continuing education for current doctors. In order for the Functional Medicine Movement to become a part of the national healthcare system, greater awareness of the program needs to be made. Americans need to understand the value of prevention rather than treatment to end the epidemic of people suffering from chronic diseases, including heart disease, cancer and mental illness.

The premise behind Dr. Ann J Peters’ practice is to focus on natural ways to fight the aging process and instill a sense of longevity in her patients’ lives. It is only normal for everyone to look and feel good, which is only possible through the use of prevention of chronic disease.

To learn more about Dr. Ann J Peters and her work as a leader in the anti-aging industry, visit http://www.drannjpetersfl.com/ or call 561-291-6997 to get in touch with her directly.

About Dr. Ann J Peters:

Ann J Peters is a leader in the anti-aging industry, with many recognitions and awards to show her expertise. Receiving her medical degree from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Dr. Peters is a diplomat with the American Board of Family Practice as well as an award winning physician from the Harvard School of Public Health. Her passion for helping others make the most out of their lives has helped many patients live a longer, fuller life free from unnecessary disease, pain or suffering.

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What is HRT?

We found this article published on ABC.net to be a helpful explanation of HRT….

Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT): understanding its benefits and risks

by Pamela Wilson

HRT, once a source of worry and confusion, is now considered an effective and safe treatment for many women troubled by symptoms of menopause.

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For some women, the physical, psychological and mental symptoms of menopause can be debilitating and life-changing.

But there are things women can do to help them regain control of their physical and emotional health during this period of their life; and hormone replacement therapy, which was once a source of great concern, is recognised as a safe and effective way to treat menopause symptoms.

What is HRT and its effects on menopausal symptoms?

Hormone replacement therapy (HRT), also known as hormone therapy (HT), is a medication containing the hormones oestrogen and progesterone, and in some cases testosterone, that can help reduce symptoms of menopause.

It is internationally acknowledged that HRT is the most effective treatment to combat these symptoms, which include hot flushes, night sweats, insomnia, joint aches, muscle pains and vaginal dryness. There is also evidence it may improve psychological wellbeing during this time.

HRT is best started:

  • during the years leading up to menopause or peri-menopause
  • before the age of 60
  • within ten years of menopause (that is from the final period a woman has).

It is also recommended that women experiencing premature menopause take HRT, at least until the age of natural menopause, which is between the ages of 45 and 55 (51 being the average).

Oestrogen-only formulations can be taken by women who’ve had a hysterectomy; combined HRT, which contains both oestrogen and progesterone, is recommended for women who haven’t had a hysterectomy because progesterone protects the uterus against cancer.

Can HRT benefit your health in other ways?

Although HRT is prescribed to alleviate the symptoms of menopause, it can have additional positive effects on a woman’s health, particularly if she takes it before the age of 60 or within 10 years of menopause.

  • Osteoporosis: it can prevent osteoporosis-related fractures. This protection doesn’t continue after five years of stopping HRT.
  • Heart disease: oestrogen-only HRT can reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. But it may actually increase the risk in women who start HRT tablets after the age of 60, and particularly over 70.
  • Dementia: while some studies indicate oestrogen may prevent or delay the onset of Alzheimer’s disease, the evidence is still slim and inconclusive.

Does it have side effects or negative health risks?

Publicity about negative health risks associated with HRT peaked in the years following a major 2002 study, known as the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), which showed HRT was linked with a raised risk of breast cancer, blood clots and strokes.

However, later analysis found the interpretations of the original findings from this study were flawed. One of the key problems was that the women in the study were significantly older than those who would normally seek treatment with HRT (with different underlying risks of disease), and yet the findings on disease risk were inappropriately extrapolated to healthy newly menopausal women. Anxiety about the WHI study results led to a 50 per cent drop in the use of HRT.

Evidence that has emerged in the decade since the 2002 study shows “that for most women starting treatment near the menopause, the benefits outweigh the risks, not just for the relief of hot flushes, night sweats and vaginal dryness, but also for reducing the risks of heart disease and fractures,” the principal investigator at the WHI Clinical Centre at the University of California, Dr Robert Langer, said in a statement marking the 10th anniversary of the study.

Current evidence shows there can be minor side effects with some HRT formulations. These include intermittent bleeding, breast discomfort, bloating and nausea.

HRT can also increase the chance of developing more serious health complications, but this risk is usually small and can be lowered further with a careful and tailored approach to HRT medications.

  • Blood clots: although there is a small risk of developing a blood clot while taking HRT (especially tablet form), it is rare if you are under the age of 60. It is more common in the first year of use and with other risk factors such as smoking and obesity.
  • Breast cancer: research shows an increased risk of developing breast cancer, but it is small and dependent on the type of HRT and length of time it’s used. For women taking oestrogen-only HRT their risk doesn’t increase for at least seven years of use; for women taking combined HRT it doesn’t increase for four to five years of use.
  • Uterine cancer: while oestrogen-only HRT can increase your chance of developing this cancer, combined HRT doesn’t. This is why women who haven’t had a hysterectomy are advised to take HRT that includes progesterone.
  • Bowel cancer: some evidence suggests it may protect against bowel cancer.

HRT is not recommended in women who have a history of breast cancer, blood clots, heart disease or stroke, or who have endometrial cancer or unexplained vaginal bleeding.

Which HRT formulation may suit you best?

Before taking HRT it’s vital women have a full medical check-up and discuss their own personal and family medical history with their doctor, so the risks and benefits of HRT can be individualised and the HRT tailored appropriately.

The different formulations are: tablets, skin patches, intra-uterine devices (IUD), gels and creams.

  • Tablets: taken daily, tablets are the most popular and commonly available formulation.
  • Skin patches: applied every three to four days, these work by slowly releasing hormones into your body. They can have fewer side effects (particularly in relation to nausea and clots), but can be irritating for some women. Absorption is understood to be more reliable and even than tablets.
  • IUD: for women who can’t tolerate progesterone tablets, the hormone can be delivered via an IUD.
  • Gel: an oestrogen gel, rubbed onto the skin daily, is a good option for women who can’t tolerate tablets and who don’t want a patch.
  • Creams: oestrogen creams that are inserted into the vagina can be useful for symptoms such as bladder leakage and dryness.

 Source:  http://www.abc.net.au/health/thepulse/stories/2013/05/29/3769270.htm#.Ub9oIPkqYrc

Mayo Clinic’s Overview on the Benefits of Hormone Therapy

Source:  http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/hormone-therapy/WO00046

Here are the benefits outlined by the Mayo Clinic for Hormone Therapy:

The benefits of hormone therapy depend, in part, on whether you take systemic hormone therapy or low-dose vaginal preparations of estrogen.

  • Systemic hormone therapy. Systemic estrogen — which comes in pill, skin patch, gel, cream or spray form — remains the most effective treatment for relief of troublesome menopausal hot flashes and night sweats. Estrogen can also ease vaginal symptoms of menopause, such as dryness, itching, burning and discomfort with intercourse. Although the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) still approves estrogen for the prevention of the bone-thinning disease called osteoporosis, doctors usually recommend medications called bisphosphonates to treat osteoporosis.
  • Low-dose vaginal products. Low-dose vaginal preparations of estrogen — which come in cream, tablet or ring form — can effectively treat vaginal symptoms and some urinary symptoms, while minimizing absorption into the body. Low-dose vaginal preparations do not help with hot flashes, night sweats or protection against osteoporosis.

Long-term systemic hormone therapy for the prevention of postmenopausal conditions is no longer routinely recommended. But some data suggest that estrogen can decrease the risk of heart disease when taken early in postmenopausal years:

  • In a recent Danish study, after 10 years of treatment, women receiving hormone replacement therapy early after menopause had a significantly reduced risk of mortality, heart failure or heart attack, without any apparent increase in risk of cancer or stroke.

MD Longevity Review: The History of Functional Medicine

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Susan And Jeffrey Bland

“Twenty years ago, functional medicine was an idea without a movement.  It is now a movement that is the single biggest game-changing idea in health care.”

The Functional Medicine Movement became more widely known after inception of The Institute for Functional Medicine (IFM).  Founded 20 years ago by Susan and Jeffrey Bland, the Institute’s charter was conceived as a systems-biology approach to the prevention and management of chronic disease utilizing appropriate tools including nutrition, lifestyle, exercise, environment, structural, cognitive, emotional, and pharmaceutical therapies to meet the individual needs of the patient.

It was the Bland’s vision to change the future of health care by developing new thought leaders and practitioners, skilled at preventing and treating chronic disease.   They put it this way:  ”We are preparing for the next 20 years with a clear strategic plan based on education, research, and collaboration. Our goal is to reverse the epidemic of chronic disease and to continue advancing the leading edge of knowledge in the decades ahead.”

To accomplish this goal, IFM built an educational platform “using innovative technologies and teaching methods that can be incorporated into medical school curriculums, residencies, fellowships, and continuing medical education”.  The Bland’s efforts have lead to the development of research models that evaluate whole-systems practices and treatment plans that involve “individualized and diverse interventions”.  To achieve these educational and research goals, IFM has collaborated with leaders in academic medicine, private sector industry, insurers, and government agencies to create pilot programs that will help integrate functional medicine into the nation’s healthcare system.

For more information about Functional Medicine click here: http://blog.mdlongevity.com/blog/?p=178

About Dr. Peters:  Dr. Peters medical practice is focused on anti-aging and longevity.  Helping clients look, feel and live longer and better by delaying, preventing and reversing the signs and symptoms of aging.  She received the most prestigious cosmopolitan education around the world.  A graduate with a medical degree from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ), she completed her medical internships and fellowships at Cornell Medical Center, New York, Harvard School of Public Health and Ospadali Galleria in Genoa, Italy.  She is a past scholar of Leopold Schlep Foundation, and the Organization of American States (OAS), New York.

Her medical affiliations include American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine, European Academy of Quality of Life and Longevity Medicine and the International Hormone Society. Board Certified with the American Academy of Family Physicians, she is a diplomat with the American Board of Family Practice and an award-recognized physician from Harvard School of Public Health.

Source: http://www.functionalmedicine.org

MD Longevity Review – Functional Medicine

Functional Medicine is a movement that is now “the single biggest game changing idea in health care”.  ”Functional medicine addresses the underlying causes of disease, using a systems-oriented approach and engaging both patient and practitioner in a therapeutic partnership.”  Although it was just an idea without a movement twenty years ago, now more than 100,000 practitioners from 73 countries recognise the principles and practices of functional medicine.  Practitioners from 46 countries and one-fifth of faculty from every

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medical school in America have attended the foundational training course, Applying Functional Medicine in Clinical Practice. This month a major milestone will be met when the first participants in IFM’s Functional Medicine Certification Program will complete their training.

Some very exciting initiatives have come from this unprecedented exposure: Corporations including Google, American Express, and Twitter are exploring the whole-systems approach of functional medicine. Leaders in medicine at major insurers, such as CIGNA, are considering how they can incorporate functional medicine in to pilot projects for chronic disease. Faith-based communities are including functional medicine models in their teaching and the Veteran’s Administration is exploring research programs.  With the support of 12 Senators, Medicare will pilot a program to lower premiums for participants in intensive lifestyle treatment programs.   Functional medicine courses are being introduced to Residencies and medical school programs.

Even our government medical leaders are impressed:  ”In 2009, the US Senate invited testimony on health reform, where functional medicine was brought to the attention of key policymakers”.  Other discussions with legislative leaders and staff followed that opportunity and have been very productive.  ”Senator Harkin now keeps a copy of the Textbook of Functional Medicine in his Senate office”  Later, IFM’s white paper, 21st Century Medicine: A New Model for Medical Education and Practice, was published and received wide spread critical acclaim.

Due to health care reform legislation passage in 2010, the National Council on Prevention, Health Promotion and Public Health was created and has an advisory group with leaders in functional medicine. “Other leading authorities in integrative medicine, such as Mehmet Oz, MD, cite functional medicine as a major influence on their thinking”

As the understanding of the benefits of Functional Medicine grow, so will improved health.

About Dr. Peters:  Dr. Peters medical practice is focused on anti-aging and longevity.  Helping clients look, feel and live longer and better by delaying, preventing and reversing the signs and symptoms of aging.  She received the most prestigious cosmopolitan education around the world.  A graduate with a medical degree from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ), she completed her medical internships and fellowships at Cornell Medical Center, New York, Harvard School of Public Health and Ospadali Galleria in Genoa, Italy.  She is a past scholar of Leopold Schlep Foundation, and the Organization of American States (OAS), New York.

Her medical affiliations include American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine, European Academy of Quality of Life and Longevity Medicine and the International Hormone Society. Board Certified with the American Academy of Family Physicians, she is a diplomat with the American Board of Family Practice and an award-recognized physician from Harvard School of Public Health.

Source: http://www.functionalmedicine.org